Lorenda Simms
Personal Real Estate Corporation

Sutton Group - West Coast Realty

Office 250-479-3333

Cell 250-217-5787

Email: lorendasimms@gmail.com

Check out this fun, budget-friendly project that will help update your space with minimal disruption to your home.

It is possible to transform kitchen cabinetry, whether wood or melamine, by simply painting it—the finish options are endless, and you’ll be left with a beautiful space that’s totally rejuvenated.


MATERIALS

  • Screwdriver
  • Painter’s tape
  • Sander or sandpaper
  • Clean cloth
  • Brush or roller
  • Paint primer (for latex paint)
  • Paint
  • Wax or finishing varnish (for chalk paint)


Pro Tip: No primer is needed for chalk paint, but a finishing wax is required.


HOW TO

  1. Remove cabinet doors and drawer fronts from cabinetry and lay them flat.
  2. Remove hardware from cabinet doors and drawer fronts or protect them with painter’s tape.
  3. Sand the surfaces to be painted, then wipe them down with a clean cloth.
  4. Use brush or roller to apply primer if you’re using latex paint; let dry.
  5. Stir paint colour well, then apply with a brush or roller. Let dry. Apply second coat of paint. Let dry completely.
  6. Apply a finishing wax if you’re using chalk paint. Let dry completely.
  7. Reinstall the hardware.
  8. Carefully re-mount cabinet doors and drawer fronts.



Source:https://www.canadianliving.com/home-and-garden/decor-and-renovation/article/how-to-paint-kitchen-cabinetry

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Minimalism is often perceived as an extreme practice, but Joshua Becker, founder and editor of website Becoming Minimalist, says it doesn't have to be. There are no real rules and contrary to what is commonly believed, it's not the practice of going without. "While it is true that you will have less, it’s less of what you don’t need, and more of what you want, like time and money.”


Becker feels that we’ve reached a saturation point with the possessions we've accumulated at which the items don't make us any happier. “Material belongings become more of a burden than a blessing,” he says.

Becker’s own journey with minimalism began about 10 years ago. While cleaning out his garage and watching his son play alone nearby, he realized that the belongings he was organizing were not adding value to, but actually detracting from his life and keeping him from what he really wanted to be doing. His story and subsequent stories he's shared on his website have inspired millions around the world to “find more life by owning fewer possessions.”


Here's how you can live a happier, more fulfilling life by practicing minimalism.


How do you begin?

There’s no need to feel overwhelmed or anxious about minimalism. Remember, there are no rules, and you only do what you are comfortable doing. “A little minimalism is better than none at all,” says Becker. Begin with the easiest space or room by purposefully getting rid of all the items you don’t need or use, like clothes that haven’t been worn for a long time and kitchen implements that you don’t use.


Becker says resist the urge to simply reorganize, which is almost always just a temporary solution, and instead sort your belongings into four groups: trash, give away, keep and relocate. Take your time with this process and carefully consider where each individual item best fits.


Need help? Learn about the infamous KonMari Method and the "life-changing magic of tidying up."


How do you get the kids on board?

Becker says that kids are usually good at embracing minimalism. Among other benefits, the process will empower them to make their own decisions and to learn about living within limits. Demonstrate your own commitment by tackling one of your own spaces first, and give your child a small space like a closet or toy box to sort through. Let them choose what to keep, based on what toys fit into that amount of space.


What should you do with all the belongings you no longer need?

Do your research and donate to a local charity that you believe in. You can also have a garage sale, drop them off at a consignment store, or sell the items online to recoup some of the money spent. For the items that are at the end of their lifeline, check to see if they can be recycled before throwing them into the garbage.


What are the benefits of living minimally?

After making just one small change, Becker predicts your simplified space will feel peaceful. Your home will be easier to clean and keep organized, resulting in more time to spend doing what you really want — and you'll have the money to do so. Plus, you’ll be a positive example for your kids, as they will learn to be less focused on consumption and kinder to the environment.


What do you do after the purge?

Resist excessive consumerism and purchase less. If you're having trouble, consult the above image of the "Buyerarchy of Needs” by Sarah Lasorovic. Make better use of what’s already available to you, prior to making a purchase. Buying should be your last resort.

Concentrate on spending your time and money on pursuing experiences, rather than stuff, and you're bound to feel more fulfilled.



Source: https://www.canadianliving.com/home-and-garden/organization-and-cleaning/article/how-minimalism-can-enhance-your-life

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Homeownership has a way of awakening the inner Bob Vila in all of us—even the ones who know nothing about home improvement. Whether you’re tackling huge renovations or tiptoeing your way into the world of DIY, these tips will help you set yourself up for success.


Have a plan
Renovations rarely go exactly to plan, but that doesn’t mean you should wing it. Last-minute changes are both stressful and expensive, so get the non-negotiable details hammered out first. At minimum, this means knowing what results you want and how much money—and time—it will take to achieve them.


Modeling and design tools like Floorplanner are super helpful in the planning phase. Create a couple different versions of the same project, then add a 10-15% buffer to your budget estimates to prepare for inevitable surprises.


Add value when possible
If you’re not sure where to start with home improvements, it can be helpful to prioritize projects that increase your home’s value. Updated kitchens and bathrooms are pretty much always a safe bet, as are any renovations that increase square footage, like finished basements and decks. But buyer preferences vary from market to market, so

be sure to focus on what’s popular and valuable where you live—not broad national trends.


Tackle quick, time-sensitive projects first
Some home improvements are more urgent than others. If a project will save you money immediately or prevent devastating damage in the future, bump it to the top of the priority list. That goes double for quick, easy fixes, like sealing drafts and replacing filters.


Find your DIY threshold

Even if you’re an experienced DIY-er with a well-stocked workshop, not all home improvement projects are suitable for amateurs. Before starting a project, gauge your interest level: How much work are you really willing to put in? Is that effort worth the money you’ll save? Be brutally honest.


If you have no idea what you’re getting into, don’t commit until you’ve spent, at minimum, a solid couple of hours watching YouTube tutorials and pricing out materials. Remember: Just because you can doesn’t mean you should.


Bone up on DIY knowledge
Everyone should know a few basic repair skills, and thanks to the internet, learning them has never been easier. If you can, start with a specific question: Is my garbage disposal broken or just clogged? Do I really need to clean my dishwasher filter? How do you refinish a coffee table? You’ll click with some blogs and video personalities more than others; next time, start with them.


If you’re more of a hands-on learner, try volunteering: You’ll learn new skills and help people at the same time. Many hardwares stores offer free clinics on basic home repair and improvement skills, too, so be sure to check the offerings in your area.


Save money by scrimping—and splurging—responsibly
Major renovations are expensive, but going full Scrooge on every single line item only creates more work later. Instead, identify where you can and can’t afford to be a little stingy. A good rule of thumb: Shell out for anything catastrophically expensive and/or difficult to replace, like hot water heaters and electrical work. For easily replaceable items—shower heads, light fixtures, drawer pulls—cheap is fine. You should also consider how much use and enjoyment you’ll get from an item. If you’re an avid cook, skimp on floor tiles so you can splurge on the stove of your dreams.


Understand your financing options
Unfortunately, most home improvements do not pay for themselves. If you can’t afford to finance the project in full with cash, you should know the different ways you can finance your home improvement without putting your home at risk.


Personal loans and credit cards can be useful for small-to-medium projects, depending on the interest rate and terms, while home equity loans (HELs) and lines of credit (HELOCs) can help finance major renovations and repairs. Improvements that increase your home’s value can cut down on private mortgage insurance payments, but keep in mind you’ll have to pay to get your home reassessed on top of everything else.


Get your tools right
You can’t really improve your home with just your bare hands—most projects require at least a multi-tool. Before you start a project of any size, be sure your toolbox actually contains the tools you’ll need. Keep in mind that some project genres need special equipment, particularly if they involve plumbing or electrical systems. When in doubt, Google it.


Find the perfect contractor

Finding a handyman or contractor you trust is a lot like finding the right dentist or therapist: Harder than it sounds, and with incredibly high stakes. It’s important to vet potential contractors carefully using these criteria:

  • Word of mouth: Ask friends, family, and neighbors for recommendations—especially if they have industry connections
  • Check for complaints: Look up your state’s consumer protection office and your local building inspection office
  • Learn which licenses and permits are required in your area for contractors, electricians, plumbers, and painters
  • Get proof of insurance: Ask contractors to provide you with their insurance details so you can verify it with the provider
  • Ask for references, then actually check them out
  • Meet with every potential candidate so you get a feel for their style
  • Get quotes—and track them with a spreadsheet or other list


For even more specific questions you should ask, check out the Federal Trade Commission’s guide on hiring a contractor.


Always keep your next project in mind
When one project ends, another begins—such is the nature of home improvement. Planning your next move is a lot harder when you can’t remember the good ideas you had while working on something else. Keep a detailed list of your project goals in a spreadsheet, notebook, or even a good old-fashioned Pinterest board so you’ll always know what’s next.



Source: https://lifehacker.com/top-10-home-improvement-tips-every-homeowner-should-kno-1656251243

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Kitchen renovations are not one size fits all. What’s important to one person may not be to another, particularly when it comes to those who love to cook and those who don’t. But when it comes to return on investment, there are certain elements that are essential. Here are a few recommendations on how to get the best ROI in your kitchen renovation.


Neutral Colours
When it comes to kitchens, I always recommend neutral colours. Actually, I insist on it. Bright and bold colours can be a real turnoff to buyers. So, if you want your kitchen to appeal to as many people as possible, neutral colours are definitely the way to go. White, cream, grey, beige and navy are all neutrals and look great in a kitchen. If you want to accent them with bright colours, do it through things like dishes, tea towels and artwork.


Transitional Style
Like neutral colours, transitional style is the safest bet in a kitchen. Overly ornate or ultra-modern styles will turn off certain buyers, so it’s wiser from a financial standpoint to stick with simple paneled doors that are just short of modern; and stainless, chrome or dark bronze hardware. When it comes to transitional style, keep it simple and approachable.


Semi-Custom Cabinetry
Custom kitchens are great for many reasons; but for people looking for great quality without a high price, semi-custom is the way to go. These types of cabinets are available in standard sizes, but offer customizable features such as decorative accents and interior storage options. Remember that cabinets serve an incredibly important function, so don’t cheap out.


Simple Tile
Some people like to make tile a feature in their kitchens; but as a general rule, I advise against it. It has always been my experience that simple tile designs in a neutral colour offer the best return on investment. That’s not to say it has to be boring. White marble tile in a honeycomb, chevron or floral pattern for instance, looks great while still being subtle.


Quartz Countertops
If you have the budget, nothing beats a quality Quartz countertop. They’re durable, offer a great ROI and look terrific. Since countertops take a lot of beatings – dishes clanging, knives scraping, spills – making the investment in something that won’t get damaged is well worth the price.


Stainless Steel Appliances
Every day I hear from someone who says they hate stainless steel. They want white and nothing will change their mind. Fair enough, but it doesn’t change the fact that stainless steel is currently the most popular finish for appliances and it will get you the best return on investment. So if you’re looking for the best ROI, stainless is the way to go.


The most important thing to remember during a kitchen renovation is that a high return on investment will only be achieved when the upgrades match the quality of the rest of the home. For instance, a high-end chef’s style kitchen won’t add much value if the rest of the house looks dated and dingy. However, when a kitchen renovation is done right and is part of a well-maintained, upgraded home, the ROI can be as much as 200%.



Source: https://www.hgtv.ca/renovations/blog/scott-mcgillivray-roi-kitchen-renovation-1922244/

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In the day-to-day craziness of life, balancing the needs of family, work and self can often create a high-stress schedule that keeps the tempo high and relaxation a precious commodity. Consider making your home an island of calm as an important source of balance.


Keeping it simple, no matter the style
The Japanese call it kanso – simplicity – after one of seven Zen principles, and you don’t need to be a minimalist to apply it to your space. In fact, these tips work even if you’re a shabby chic bohemian maximalist though, of course, your methods of incorporating will vary from your modernist industrial friends or neighbours. It’s all about what brings you peace, so feel free to try any or all these tactics.


Kill the clutter
One designer’s bric-a-brac is another person’s junk pile, so “clutter” can be a very subjective idea. Sometimes the best thing to do to kick start the decluttering process, is a deep clean. No matter how busy your decorating scheme, though, certain places must be clutter-free, such as the kitchen counters and sink. Keep traffic areas clear for easy movement and, if anything is closing in on you when you sit down, let it be the arms of a wingback chair. Any time cozy turns to cramped, there’s a decluttering opportunity.


Get natural
There’s no need to be knee-deep in Arts and Crafts to benefit from the peace the natural world offers. It may be as simple as putting up a window treatment around a view of your favourite flowers in the garden. Natural light is often a stress reliever in weather fair or foul.

The principle is called biophilia – the love of nature – and a touch of it in your design scheme can be both personal and calming. Your choice of houseplants, for instance, can help bring a personal focal point to a room.


See the light
Don’t take your lightbulbs for granted! Using different sources, including natural light (or its absence), can evoke virtually any emotion, so choose wisely. Few people would think of a fluorescent fixture over their bed as a relaxing way to ease into sleep. Think of light as a design layer as well as functional. Add lighting styles and levels to help you relax.


Colour and calm
Most people have a sense of the colours they respond to, as well as moods the colours evoke. Yet, there are also many people trying to relax in rooms lined with generic builder’s paint. Consider how colour psychology influences your sense of calm and make the switch.


Comfort quotients
Some like silk while others like linen. Design isn’t strictly about appearance. An attractive bedding option moves from satisfactory to superior when it’s made from a fabric you love to touch. Aromatherapy may be as simple as a light wave of vanilla or refreshing hints of lavender. Comfort can arrive through any of your senses, and any of these can bring you peace.

Most everyone has seen a sofa they love but, after trying it, wonder what sort of creature it was designed for, since it’s obviously not comfortable for humans. There’s a reason why the stereotype of the dad with the ratty recliner exists. Sometimes comfort is in the behind of the beholder.


Heal thyself
No one knows what speaks to you quite like you do. No matter how sparse or busy your personal design style, never forget the touches that bring you peace. Perhaps it’s a photo from a recent vacation, a curio you received as a gift or maybe an old canoe paddle that reminds you of long-ago summers at camp.

Managing stress is a big part of a balanced life in today’s busy world. Caring for our homes is an extension of caring for ourselves, so approaching design with calmness in mind is hardly a pretension, but instead a powerful tool for wellness.



Source: https://www.creacafe.ca/finding-calm-design-trends-to-balance-stress/

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Check out this fun, budget-friendly project that will help update your space with minimal disruption to your home.


Useful for drawing, jotting memos or words of inspiration, chalkboard paint breaks the “no writing on the walls” rule, to the delight of children and some adults, too! This type of paint can be found in most hardware stores—commonly in black, but also available in colour shades. Great spots for a coat of chalkboard paint include walls in the kitchen, mudroom, entry hall, office or kid’s bedroom. 






MATERIALS
TSP cleaner
Painter’s tape
Sander or sandpaper
Chalkboard paint primer
Chalkboard paint
Brush or roller


HOW TO
Clean the wall with TSP cleaner according to directions on the package.
Outline the area to be painted with painter’s tape.
Sand the wall to be painted.
Apply the appropriate primer; let dry for the required time.
Stir the paint well, then apply with a brush or roller, using two to three coats six hours apart (or according to the manufacturer’s instructions).


Pro Tip: You can also purchase chalkboard spray paint for easy application on small surfaces like furniture or accessories. It’s not designed for painting a wall.



Source: https://www.canadianliving.com/home-and-garden/decor-and-renovation/article/how-to-create-a-chalkboard-wall

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